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SignalSilence® p53 siRNA I #6231

Item# Description List Price Web Price Qty
6231S SignalSilence® p53 siRNA I - 300 µl $375.00
$337.50
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Applications Reactivity
Transfection Human

Western Blotting

Western Blotting

Western blot analysis of extracts from HeLa cells, transfected with non-targeted (-) or SignalSilence® p53 siRNA I (+), using p53 Antibody #9282 and p42 MAP Kinase (Erk2) Antibody #9108. The p53 antibody confirms silencing of p53 expression, while the p42 MAPK antibody was used to control for loading and specificity of p53 siRNA.

Fluorescent Detection

Fluorescent Detection

Fluorescent detection of SignalSilence® Control siRNA (Fluorescein Conjugate) #6201 in living HeLa cells 24 hours post-transfection, demonstrating nearly 100% transfection efficiency.

Description

SignalSilence® p53 siRNA I from Cell Signaling Technology (CST) allows the researcher to specifically inhibit p53 expression using RNA interference, a method whereby gene expression can be selectively silenced through the delivery of double stranded RNA molecules into the cell. All SignalSilence® siRNA products from CST are rigorously tested in-house and have been shown to reduce target protein expression by western analysis.

Directions For Use

CST recommends transfection with 100 nM p53 siRNA I 48 to 72 hours prior to cell lysis. See protocol for transfection procedure. For transfection procedure, follow protocol provided by the transfection reagent manufacturer. Please feel free to contact CST with any questions on use.

Background

The p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a major role in cellular response to DNA damage and other genomic aberrations. Activation of p53 can lead to either cell cycle arrest and DNA repair or apoptosis (1). p53 is phosphorylated at multiple sites in vivo and by several different protein kinases in vitro (2,3). DNA damage induces phosphorylation of p53 at Ser15 and Ser20 and leads to a reduced interaction between p53 and its negative regulator, the oncoprotein MDM2 (4). MDM2 inhibits p53 accumulation by targeting it for ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation (5,6). p53 can be phosphorylated by ATM, ATR, and DNA-PK at Ser15 and Ser37. Phosphorylation impairs the ability of MDM2 to bind p53, promoting both the accumulation and activation of p53 in response to DNA damage (4,7). Chk2 and Chk1 can phosphorylate p53 at Ser20, enhancing its tetramerization, stability, and activity (8,9). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser392 in vivo (10,11) and by CAK in vitro (11). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser392 is increased in human tumors (12) and has been reported to influence the growth suppressor function, DNA binding, and transcriptional activation of p53 (10,13,14). p53 is phosphorylated at Ser6 and Ser9 by CK1δ and CK1ε both in vitro and in vivo (13,15). Phosphorylation of p53 at Ser46 regulates the ability of p53 to induce apoptosis (16). Acetylation of p53 is mediated by p300 and CBP acetyltransferases. Inhibition of deacetylation suppressing MDM2 from recruiting HDAC1 complex by p19 (ARF) stabilizes p53. Acetylation appears to play a positive role in the accumulation of p53 protein in stress response (17). Following DNA damage, human p53 becomes acetylated at Lys382 (Lys379 in mouse) in vivo to enhance p53-DNA binding (18). Deacetylation of p53 occurs through interaction with the SIRT1 protein, a deacetylase that may be involved in cellular aging and the DNA damage response (19).

Small interfering RNA (siRNA) has been used to specifically silence p53 expression in human tumor cells (20).

  1. Levine, A.J. (1997) Cell 88, 323-31.
  2. Meek, D.W. (1994) Semin Cancer Biol 5, 203-10.
  3. Milczarek, G.J. et al. (1997) Life Sci 60, 1-11.
  4. Shieh, S.Y. et al. (1997) Cell 91, 325-34.
  5. Chehab, N.H. et al. (1999) Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 96, 13777-82.
  6. Honda, R. et al. (1997) FEBS Lett 420, 25-7.
  7. Tibbetts, R.S. et al. (1999) Genes Dev 13, 152-7.
  8. Shieh, S.Y. et al. (1999) EMBO J 18, 1815-23.
  9. Hirao, A. et al. (2000) Science 287, 1824-7.
  10. Hao, M. et al. (1996) J Biol Chem 271, 29380-5.
  11. Lu, H. et al. (1997) Mol Cell Biol 17, 5923-34.
  12. Ullrich, S.J. et al. (1993) Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 90, 5954-8.
  13. Kohn, K.W. (1999) Mol Biol Cell 10, 2703-34.
  14. Lohrum, M. and Scheidtmann, K.H. (1996) Oncogene 13, 2527-39.
  15. Knippschild, U. et al. (1997) Oncogene 15, 1727-36.
  16. Oda, K. et al. (2000) Cell 102, 849-62.
  17. Ito, A. et al. (2001) EMBO J 20, 1331-40.
  18. Sakaguchi, K. et al. (1998) Genes Dev 12, 2831-41.
  19. Solomon, J.M. et al. (2006) Mol Cell Biol 26, 28-38.
  20. Irwin, M.S. et al. (2003) Cancer Cell 3, 403-10.

Application References

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